Global Ministries

The United Methodist Church

Connecting the Church in Mission

Global Ministries - ConnectNMission
April 2016 · Issue 4

The April edition of the Global Health Newsletter offers a grahic for sharing through social media in observance of World Malaria Day, April 25; highlights some of the challenges at Mutambara United Methodist Hospital in Zimbabwe; spotlights rural healthcare in Nepal; and offers a video on Abundant Health: Our Promise to Children.


World Malaria Day is April 25

World Malaria Day.
Share this graphic in observance of World Malaria Day, April 25, with your social media networks and spread the word about how lives are being saved through malaria prevention initiatives.

This image captures Zainab Kamara and her daughter Ramahilai, who is sick with malaria. Ramahilai received care at The United Methodist Church's Kissy Hospital outside Freetown, Sierra Leone.

View larger size here and learn more about this preventable disease.






Zimbabwe: Training Home-based Care Workers

Women wait to see a doctor at Mutambara United Methodist Hospital in Zimbabwe.
In rural Zimbabwe, people living with HIV and AIDS and their family members often do not find the medical care or medicine they need due either to a lack of qualified hospital staff or a shortage of available medicine.

At Mutambara United Methodist Hospital in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe, which services a population of approximately 140,000, these are some of the challenges.

“Due to the shortage, we have to use staff that is not qualified to perform specific duties,” stated Dr. Alistar Matambo of Mutambara Hospital. “When we are doing a procedure, the doctor has to act as both surgeon and assistant. In some instances, we provide the anesthesia, as well.”

The hospital is also running below 40 percent availability of essential drugs. This compromises the quality of care and increases the hospital stay of patients.

Thankfully, a grant from Global Ministries’ Global Health unit to Mutambara Hospital supported the training of 30 women volunteers, who learned to provide compassionate, home-based care to people living with HIV and AIDS and their families.

The volunteer care teams, equipped with a care kit, uniform, and community approval, make monthly home visits to care for patients’ most basic needs. They offer friendship, food, wound care, and bathing. The training of home-based care workers helps lessen the load of hospital outpatient care.

You can support Global Health with your gifts to Advance #3021770.

Nepal: A Mother’s Hope for a Child

Shanti Subba and her newborn son.
Shanti Subba is married and lives in a remote area of Nepal near Mt. Kanchenjunga. After numerous failed pregnancies, Shanti believed she was unable to have children. Then she became pregnant again, and she felt hopeful.

When Shanti finally went into labor, she had to be carried to the nearest road, a day’s journey from her home, to await a vehicle that would transport her to the Taplejung District Hospital.

District hospitals in Nepal can serve populations of 200,000, but often they are understaffed and have no one to provide emergency services.

“Our organization partners with communities to build up their curative hospital services, said Mark Zimmerman, a Global Ministries missionary serving as director of the Nick Simons Institute (NSI).

The organization trains healthcare workers to reach rural Nepali people, who may not otherwise have access to basic healthcare.

Dr. Uttam Pachya, a family practice doctor, cared for Shanti when she arrived at the hospital. He realized that the baby’s head was in the wrong position. The medical team performed an emergency C-section, which saved the baby and mother. The next day, Shanti’s husband was doting over his wife and new son.

“This scene plays out in different places with different interventions all over Nepal,” said Zimmerman.



Abundant Health: Our Promise to Children

Worldwide, 6 million children under 5 years of age die annually from preventable illnesses such as malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, or birth complications.

Global Health is promoting children’s health and wholeness through a new signature health initiative, “Abundant Health: Our Promise to Children,” which aims to provide lifesaving health interventions to 1 million children by 2020.

Watch the video to learn more.

Photo 1: Zainab Kamara and her daughter Ramahilai, who is sick with malaria, receive care at The United Methodist Church's Kissy Hospital outside Freetown, Sierra Leone. Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS

Photo 2: Women wait to see a doctor at Mutambara United Methodist Hospital in Zimbabwe. Photo: James Rollins

Photo 3: Shanti Subba and her newborn son. Photo courtesy of Mark Zimmerman.